Anonymous Attacks Facebook (not actually)

anon atttack on fb

The hacktavist group Anonymous is said to be currently attacking Facebook. This is part of the response to the shuttering of Megaupload, the webs most popular file locker, on January 17 2012. Anonymous has been on a Denial of Service spree these last few days, causing service outages for a number of worldwide government agencies, companies and organizations that were implicated or condoned the Megaupload raids. The validity of the reports are questionable though.

So far the attack (if its actually happening) has yielded few results, Facebook was reported to be running slowly by a few twitter users. Some of the Facebook applications and games were also either slow or inaccesible. The DDoS attempt will probably be unsuccessful on a site of this size, as Facebook has numerous counter-measure to this type of harassment.

Because of the amorphous structure of Anonymous, it’s not certain that the attack is actually taking place. Some members or subgroups may be acting alone or may not have been able to drum up enough support from other members. Some anonymous mouthpieces on Twitter are claiming Facebook is under attack while others (like the one pictures below) are denying it.

anonymous attacks facebook tweet

Facebook’s connection to the Megaupload raids is not immediately clear, and some question why it is a target. The motivation is mostly to spread awareness about the harm of censorship and the ACTA bills. The anons posit that the recent pro copyright holder legislation that has been put forward around the world is not being met with enough public backlash and that they need a “wakeup call”.

Update 9:15PM EST
It looks like it was not Anonymous that caused the outage after all. Trolled indeed.

trolled

 

FileSonic closes filesharing | FileSonic Megaupload Alternatives

Filesonic Disable file sharing

This afternoon FileSonic, one of the most popular internet file lockers, disabled it’s file sharing functionality. That is, you will no longer be able to access files uploaded by other users or upload new files to be publicly accessed. Individuals who have uploaded files to FileSonic can still access their own files but have to be logged into their FileSonic account to do so.

This is in response the recent shutdown of Megaupload, a competing file locker, by the FBI earlier this week. FileSonic shares many of the same characteristics of Megaupload; it had lots of copyrighted material, it only complied with the DCMA regulations on the surface, and links to files that they host frequently turn up on websites that act as linked directories of copyrighted files (ie Filestube).

Many internet users are now concerned that many other file sharing utilities may also have to take feature limiting defensive moves in order to be allowed to continue to operate. Drop Box, one of the most use full and widely used methods of sharing files, is often cited as another prime target. We don’t think that it is any danger as it’s business model is far different from most of the file lockers. First of all, if a file is downloaded too many times it is removed from of Drop Box where ass on the less scrupulous file lockers it’s encouraged. Secondly, Drop Box monetizes the file uploader, not the downloader reducing the incentive of sharing copyright materials.

That said, there are many other file lockers who do share the same business model  as Megaupload and FileSonic who will certainly have to adapt in order to stay online.

Update
FileServe has followed FileSonic in closing it’s file links to the public. There will most certainly be more casualties in the file sharing ecosystem in the near future.

You can check out our list of alternatives to FileSonic and FileServe to help you find a new file sharing resource.